Ralph Goodale

Your member of parliament for


Regina-Wascana

Ralph Goodale

Your member of parliament for


Regina-Wascana

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Ralph Goodale Announces Funding for Local Projects Addressing Family Violence

Creative Solutions to Easing Victimization’s Effects will help improve the physical and mental health of survivors of family violence

 

December 15, 2016                Regina, SASKATCHEWAN Public Health Agency of Canada

One third of Canadian adults experience physical or sexual abuse before the age of 15. Family violence represents more than one quarter of violent crimes reported to police. Family violence is a serious public health issue with long-lasting consequences for physical and mental health, not only for survivors, but for their families and society as well.

Today, on behalf of Canada’s Minister of Health, Ralph Goodale, Canada’s Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, announced $598,893 in federal funding over four years for a project to supportIndigenous women living off-reserve in Regina, Moose Jaw and Prince Albert who are survivors of family violence.

Administered by the Provincial Association of Transition Houses and Services of Saskatchewan, the Creative Solutions to Easing Victimization’s Effects project will provide a trauma-informed, culturally relevant, and arts-based intervention.

The Government of Canada is committed to ensuring the health and safety of all Canadians, and supporting survivors of violence through programs that help them to recover their physical and mental health. Family violence can range from physical abuse to emotional abuse and neglect, and can lead to various health issues, including depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder and chronic illnesses.   Public health programs play a role in preventing and responding to family violence by supporting the response of the health system to violence, and helping survivors rebuild their lives and regain their health.

 

Quick Facts

  • One third of Canadian adults experience physical or sexual abuse before the age of 15. Family violence represents more than one quarter of violent crimes reported to police.
  • Women and girls, people with disabilities, Indigenous peoples, and people who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans or questioning are at an increased risk of experiencing family violence and its impacts.
  • Women are more likely than men to experience severe and chronic forms of intimate partner violence and are more likely to sustain serious health impacts.
  • The consequences of family violence can include both short-term and long-term mental and physical health effects.
  • Family violence also has social and economic costs. Spousal violence alone costs Canadian society $7.4 billion annually.
  • The 16 Days of Activism Against Gender-Based Violence begin on the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women on November 25 and end on International Human Rights Day on December 10.

 Quotes

“The Government of Canada is committed to taking action on violence. Through the work of numerous projects across the country funded by the Public Health Agency of Canada, such as the Creative Solutions to Easing Victimization’s Effects project, survivors of family violence will know they are not alone in rebuilding their lives and their health.”

Jane Philpott

Minister of Health

“As we commemorate the 16 Days of Activism Against Gender-Based Violence, which run through December 10, we are reminded of the devastating impact of family violence on women and girls. The damage is especially hard on Indigenous women, who are nearly three times more likely to be victimized than non-Indigenous women. The Creative Solutions to Easing Victimization’s Effects project will help provide culturally relevant support inSaskatchewan to survivors to help them rebuild their lives.”

Ralph Goodale

Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness”

“PATHS is very pleased to be working with our member agencies and Indigenous partners to develop and deliver a unique trauma and violence informed artistic and cultural program to increase the physical and mental wellbeing of Indigenous women who have experienced intimate partner violence.  In keeping with the TRC calls to action, this project will offer traditional Indigenous healing through hands-on activities and the shared wisdom of Indigenous Knowledge Keepers.”

Jo-Anne Dusel, Provincial Coordinator

Provincial Association of Transition Houses and Services of Saskatchewan (PATHS)

Creative Solutions to Easing Victimization’s Effects

Related Links

 

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Contacts

 

Andrew MacKendrick

Office of Jane Philpott

Minister of Health

613-957-0200

 

Scott Bardsley

Office of Ralph Goodale

Minister of Public Safety

613-998-5681

 

Media Relations
Health Canada and Public Health Agency of Canada
613-957-2983